Crop Explorer - Commodity Intelligence Reports - United States

Commodity Intelligence Reports - United States

Mar 24 2010 | Will Lots of Stocks Push Wheat Area Down?
A big item in the news related to crop production has been the increasing estimates for wheat stocks. According to the USDA, stocks are projected up 19 percent from last year for the major exporting countries of Australia, Canada, the European Union, and the United States, in total. High supplies have put a damper on prices and enthusiasm for planting wheat will likely be down, especially for the Northern Hemisphere spring crop which will be planted in May and June.

May 23 2002 | Heavy Precipitation Dampens 2002 Planting Prospects in the U.S. Corn Belt
Numerous heavy precipitation events during April and May drenched the Corn Belt states of Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio adversely impacting planting of summer crops. Cumulative precipitation for the Eastern U.S. during May 1-20, 2002 shows the wetness extending into the northeast from Missouri. Seasonal precipitation for the Corn Belt for the period March 1 through May 20, 2002 shows a broad band of sustained wetness across Missouri, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. The Bootheel region of Missouri was particularly hard hit.

Apr 5 2002 | Special Report: Oklahoma Winter Wheat Condition
Rainfall during September-October 2001 favored planting, emergence, and establishment of the 2002 Oklahoma winter wheat crop. Soil moisture levels in fall 2001 were much better for wheat planting and growth than those experienced a year ago for the 2001 (fall 2000) wheat crop. Precipitation during winter-early spring 2001/2002 was much below normal, as well as below that registered over the past few years. Low soil moisture levels during Spring 2002 have resulted in poorer winter wheat conditions in Oklahoma as of April 1, 2002, compared to recent years.

Apr 2 2002 | Special Report: Kansas Winter Wheat Condition
Rainfall during September-October 2001 favored planting, emergence, and establishment of the 2002 Kansas winter wheat Crop. Soil moisture levels in fall 2001 were much better for wheat growth than those experienced a year ago for the 2001 wheat crop. Precipitation during winter-early spring 2001/2002 was much below normal and that registered in recent years. Low soil moisture levels during spring 2002 have resulted in poorer winter wheat conditions in Kansas as of April 1, 2002, compared to recent years.

Sep 4 2001 | Special Report: North Dakota Crop Conditions
Summer crop conditions were generally better at the end of August 2001 than last year across North Dakota. Warm and dry weather at months' end favored spring grain harvesting and other field work. During much of the growing season, cool weather and soggy soils hurt field work and interfered with crop development. Analysis of satellite imagery and other information shows that vegetation (summer crops, hay and pasture) during August 2001 was greater than this same time last year. Production of durum and spring wheat is down in area and in yield from last year, along with production and area of most summer crops. However, production, area planted, and forecast yields of soybeans are up from last year.

May 28 2001 | Summary of U.S. Conditions through March 28, 2001
Northern Plains--Abundant snow cover and wet soils could lead to spring planting delays and possible flooding. Southern Plains--Wide area of better than last year soil moisture. Fall planting was hurt by drought. Cooler weather delayed re-emergence compared to 2000, 1999, and 1998. Texas: large area of improved soil moisture. Pacific Northwest and Montana--Dryness limits crop condition for winter wheat, pastures, and rangeland. California--Late February and March precipitation improved crop prospects. Recent warmth in San Joaquin Valley got crop year off to early start.

Apr 27 2001 | Current U.S. Crop Conditions
Northern Plains  Abundant soil moisture and cold soil temperatures are delaying spring field work. Flooding was localized. Southern Plains--Winter wheat establishment was hurt by Fall 2000 drought. Vegetation growth has been delayed compared to 2000, 1999, and 1998, due to to cooler temperatures and poor winter growing conditions. While soil moisture is mostly adequate. Large areas of poor/uneven wheat conditions are visible. Abandonment will be greater than recent years. Grasses and natural vegetation in Texas are much better than last (drought) year at this time. Pacific Northwest and Montana  Dryness limits crop condition for winter wheat, pastures, and rangeland. California  While soil moisture is currently adequate, irrigation supplies are below normal. In general, the further north you go, the further precipitation lags behind normal.

Apr 23 2001 | Flooding in North Central U.S. Will Likely
Red River of the North  The April 17, 2001 NOAA 16 satellite image shows visible flooding from Grand Forks to Winnipeg. Dark blue indicates flood waters. The black area of the Red River Valley and surrounding area shows saturated soils. Planting conditions for spring grains (barley, spring wheat, durum, and oats) will be difficult and delayed, much like 1999. A NOAA 14 satellite image taken from April 22, 1997, two days after the Red River crested at Fargo, is included for comparison. The magnitude of this years Red River flood is much less than the 1997 Flood of the Century. ""As well as being very wet, soil temperatures are very cold in North Dakota. Further causing planting delays. Graphs of Cass County and Grand Forks County cumulative temperatures are included. Note that 2001 is the coldest year. Last year was a warm and dry spring, facilitating early planting.

Apr 5 2001 | Southern Oregon and Northern California: Very Dry Weather in Entire Area
Precipitation in Southern Oregon and Northern California in winter 2000/2001 has been below normal, and was much below that of the winters of 1999 and 2000. This is true of the entire Pacific Northwest and the northern-most counties of California. Moisture is the limiting factor for winter wheat, barley, hay crops, and pastures. Summer crops will be very dependent on irrigation. Landsat satellite images from August 2000 give a good indication of the amount of crops normally irrigated in these counties.

Mar 16 2001 | Southern Plains Winter Wheat Emerges From Dormancy
Analysis of satellite imagery and weather data indicates that the 2001 Hard Red Winter Wheat Crop in the Southern Plains (Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Nebraska, and Colorado) is emerging from dormancy at a later date than seen in recent crop years. However, in 1998, 1999, and 2000, February and March weather was generally warmer than normal.

Nov 17 2000 | Colder Weather Crosses the Major Hard Red Winter Wheat Growing Area
The 2001 Hard Red Winter Wheat Crop for the most part has undergone stressful conditions since planting began in early September 2000. Planting began with very limited top soil moisture across most of Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Oklahoma and Texas. Planting progress lagged behind normal (and recent years) as producers waited for rainfall. During the second half of October and continuing into the first half of November, frequent storms finally brought moisture in the form of soaking rains and snow. As of November 12, 2000, the NASS state statisticians reported that 93 percent of the Kansas wheat crop has been planted, but rainfall the prior week virtually halted new planting fieldwork. During the same week of November 1999, 100 percent of the Kansas wheat crop was planted, and during the past 5 years 99 percent of the Kansas crop was planted by November 12. Only 67 percent of the Oklahoma wheat crop has been planted as of November 12; last year 96 percent of the crop was planted, and 97 percent is the 5 year average. Across Texas, 83 percent of the wheat crop has been planted, while last year 86 percent of the crop was planted, and the 5 year average is 91 percent. Nebraska and Colorado report that 100 percent of their wheat was planted by November 12, 2000 and 100 percent was last year's level as well as the 5 year average. A Hard Winter Wheat Major Crop Area and Cotton Growing Area Maps illustrate typical area distribution of hard red winter wheat production across the U.S. and indicate that planting should be nearing completion by early November. Cotton harvest continues during November and December.

Oct 30 2000 | Recent Rains Improve Winter Wheat, Pasture and Rangeland Prospects In Texas
Prior to planting and establishment of the 2000/01 winter wheat crop, the southern plains states and particularly Texas, were suffering from "drought" conditions. Over the next several days, the FSA - FAS Center for Remote Sensing Analysis will be publishing observations on winter wheat establishment across Oklahoma, Texas, Nebraska, Colorado, and Kansas.

Oct 27 2000 | Recent Rains Improve Winter Wheat Prospects In Oklahoma
Prior to planting and establishment of the 2000/01 winter wheat crop, the southern plains states were suffering from "drought" conditions. Over the next several days, the FSA - FAS Center for Remote Sensing Analysis will be publishing observations on winter wheat establishment across Oklahoma, Texas, Nebraska, Colorado, and Kansas. On October 25, a story highlighting Kansas conditions was released. While this report will focus on conditions in Oklahoma, since release of the Kansas report, rain in Kansas has continued across the major wheat growing areas of the central and western crop districts, especially reaching the southwest district. A 24 hour precipitation map prepared by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center ending at 12Z on October 24, illustrates the rainfall distribution since the Kansas condition report. Note the heavy rainfall also in some of the Summer 2000's driest areas of Texas, New Mexico, and western Oklahoma. A 7 day precipitation map, also prepared by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, illustrates the rainfall distribution for the bulk of this beneficial Southern Plains rainfall. Rainfall across the major wheat producing areas since October 21 ranges from 1 inch to much greater than 5 inches.

Oct 25 2000 | Rain Benefits Kansas Winter Wheat Establishment
Prior to planting and establishment of the 2000/01 winter wheat crop in the southern plains, states have suffered through "drought" conditions. Over the next several days, the FSA - FAS Center for Remote Sensing Analysis will be publishing observations on winter wheat establishment across Oklahoma, Texas, Nebraska, Colorado, and Kansas. The first state highlighted is Kansas.

Jul 18 2000 | Higher Prices Spur U.S. Cotton Production, While Foreign Output Falls in 2000/01
World cotton area and production for the 2000/01 season is estimated at 32.6 million hectares and 87.4 million bales. This forecast was based on several factors with cotton prices and those of competing crops playing a crucial role. Cotton production is also influenced by domestic and world financial conditions, government policies, and weather.

Mar 17 2000 | March Rainfall Improved Crop Conditions in Parts of the Western U.S.
During the first half of March 2000, precipitation has been more frequent across the western United States, bringing drought relief and improving prospects for year 2000 crops. However, some areas that are experiencing drought missed out on this rainfall. Also, Northern California and the Pacific Northwest continued to receive above normal precipitation, a trend that has continued since November 1999.

Feb 28 2000 | Southern Plains - Update
As of February 28, 2000, satellite imagery indicates that winter wheat crop conditions are good to very good across the major production areas of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Drought in Texas, and low surface moisture in Kansas and Oklahoma were a concern for wheat establishment in Autumn 1999. A February 21, 2000, NOAA 14 satellite image of Kansas, Oklahoma, and northern Texas is linked here. The bright red areas are primarily winter wheat in Kansas and Oklahoma, and irrigated winter wheat and alfalfa in northern Texas. Imagery analysis and monitoring precipitation and soil moisture models indicates that the hard winter wheat crop in these states is at least normal to better than normal at this time, but not as good as the 1997, 1998, and 1999 crops. Moisture levels were generally greater during February of those crop years.

Nov 19 1999 | West Virginia - Drought Continues
As of mid-November 1999, drought continues across the western half of the Mid-Atlantic States and stretches westward through the eastern and southern Corn Belt. Analysis of satellite imagery through early November 1999 indicates that vegetation throughout West Virginia is much lower than in recent years. The link below is to a vegetation index difference map, comparing mid-October vegetation levels. Pasture grasses and emerging winter grains usually account for the measurable vegetation during this time period. As of November 14, 1999, the West Virginia Agricultural Statistical Reporting Service reported that 18 percent of the state's topsoil moisture was very short, 55 percent was short, and only 27 percent was adequate. Another consequence of the drought has been the need to haul water supplies to a growing percentage of the State's livestock population.

Oct 25 1999 | North Carolina Floods- Update
On September 24 and October 12, 1999, the Production Estimates and Crop Assessment Division of FAS released reports and satellite images, discussing the impact of Hurricane Floyd and subsequent rainfall on eastern North Carolina. On October 16 and 17, 1999, Hurricane Irene brought heavy rain and high winds to this area. A large shield of rain well north of the center of Irene dumped 1 to 3 inches of rain on the coastal Carolinas on the 16th . On the 17th, as the hurricane neared the South Carolina coast, heavy rains overspread the Hurricane Floyd flood-ravaged areas of eastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia. Totals of 4 to 7 inches were common from northeastern South Carolina, eastern North Carolina, and southeastern Virginia. With heavy rains falling on top of saturated soils and swollen streams, new flooding occurred along the Tar, Neuse, and Cape Fear River systems of eastern North Carolina.

Oct 12 1999 | Hurricane Floyd - Update
During September 1999, three tropical systems -- Hurricane Floyd and Tropical Storms Dennis and Harvey -- and several strong cold fronts contributed to drought-ending rains along the Atlantic Seaboard, but Floyd and subsequent rainfall caused extensive flooding and property damage in the eastern Mid-Atlantic region. The worst damage was in eastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia. Cotton, peanut, tobacco, and soybean production levels were reduced in the production estimates released by USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) October 8, 1999 and harvest progress was slowed due to wet and muddy fields. NASS estimated that 60,000 acres of cotton would be abandoned in North Carolina and yields reduced from early forecasts. Eastern North Carolina tobacco growers experienced yield reductions and "harvested area" declined by 10,000 acres from previous forecasts. Fortunately some fields were over 50 percent harvested at the time that Floyd hit or losses would have been even greater. Virginia and North Carolina peanut production estimates were reduced, down 16 percent from September's forecast. Soybean yield estimates were lowered by 3 bushels from earlier estimates in North Carolina due to excessive wetness and storm damage.


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